Articles



THE LIFE CYCLE OF A TICKET

From the small "do-it-yourselfer" to big companies with large projects, each Pennsylvania 811 underground locate request tells a unique story. Each excavation job has its own life cycle and each depends on the sort of excavator, the complexity and size of the job, and the type of work.

FIVE STEPS TO SAFER DIGGING

The five steps featured in the articles below illustrate the best practices that should be employed by all stakeholders on digging projects to prevent damage to underground facilities.
Step 3 - Locate Accurately
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Step 4 - Respect the Marks
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Step 5 - Dig Carefully
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CROSS BORES

A cross bore compromises the structural integrity of either the utility or the underground structure, and is created when a utility is mistakenly and unknowingly installed to pierce or pass through another utility, e.g., when a gas or electric line installed by mini-HDD, impact moling, or plowing ends up passing through an existing sewer lateral. Although HDD excavation to install underground utilities has many advantages (cost, installation time, reduced need to restore area to its original state), there are dangers.

WHITE LINING MAKES A DIFFERENCE

When placing excavation notifications, white lining makes a difference. In Pennsylvania, Act 287, as amended states: "An excavator shall use the color white to mark a proposed excavation site when exact site information cannot be provided." When white lines are not indicated, additional information is needed to provide exact site information about the location of proposed excavation.